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Q&A, Learning to hang glide :: RE: selecting a school

5 September, 2015 - 01:35
Author: oden
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 5:35 pm (GMT -8)

Sorry, finally getting a chance to reply...too much time on the road the past several days.

Both people I know trained with Paul. The problem isn't the training, its the training hill. Morningside has the biggest training hill in the country pretty much. It can take you from hardly getting your feet off the ground to giving you chance to ridge soar all without ever launching from a mountain. You can get you H2 without having to aerotow because the have the facility that can give you the chance to work on your landing approach without having you take you up aerotowing to do it. When you have a bigger training hill you can do all your training from the training hill and not have to use mechanical means to get your training in. There is a difference from getting your feet a few feet off the ground to getting your feet a few hundred feet off the ground and into true flight. Some people can easily adjust, others can't. Some people are afraid of heights but they can easily fly in a hot air balloon, others can't. Time shall tell how well you can overcome a big hurdle.

Hang gliding Videos :: RE: Nice day for a speed glide, Forbord, Norway

5 September, 2015 - 01:01
Author: snowbird
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 5:01 pm (GMT -8)

Very nicely done, thank you!

Hang gliding general :: RE: Optimal pilot body weight

4 September, 2015 - 22:25
Author: Roadrunner
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 2:25 pm (GMT -8)

Well, here is some Food for Thought. I have flown my Predator 158 with Ballast. a lot of water Ballast. I have flown my Predator at a 340Lb hook-in weight. The Glider seemed to be fine with packing the weight. I flew the Glider at this heavy Hook-In weight at a Site that I have flown many times before. John told me that no-one that he knows of has flown the Glider heavier. Hell he should know, after all he designed the thing.

I say that a predator 158, just likes weight.

Hang gliding general :: RE: Does VG affect sink rate?

4 September, 2015 - 22:15
Author: Sford
Subject: Re: Re does VG setting have an effect on sink rate
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 2:15 pm (GMT -8)

Quote from LW's post: "The polar doesn't simply shift over with change in VG like it does with change in wing loading.

The polar changes shape with VG, so all speeds are not change uniformly or even in the same direction on the polar.[/quote]"

I can see that happening: VG changes wing shape, polar should change shape a bit too. I guess I shouldn't make a broad generality of cardinal speed increase across the board based on my perceived experience with my 2000 Litespeed.

Thanks!

SF

Hang gliding general :: RE: Optimal pilot body weight

4 September, 2015 - 21:05
Author: LW
Subject: Re: Optimal pilot body weight
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:05 pm (GMT -8)

Darbbb wrote:
Though I love my 155, I am just above the 215 “Optimal Pilot Weight” (body, not hookin weight) and worry that I am losing a good bit of ground in my wing loading, especially on light days.

If you love your Sport 2 155, then don't worry about it! It's a great glider and you are in the safe range if slightly on the high side, as are many happy Sport 2 155 pilots.

There are a number of gliders that will out perform it, and they all come with a cost in some other category.

Hang gliding Videos :: RE: Moyes Gecko 155 Demo Flight Narrated

4 September, 2015 - 21:05
Author: NMERider
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:05 pm (GMT -8)

once&future wrote: SO now that the Aussie dollar is at 70 cents US - down from $1.10 a couple of years ago - should we be seeing a 40% drop in their glider prices? Better check with Moyes on this one. Otherwise you'd have had to been selling Aussie dollars short when it was strong and buying them back at a reduced price when weak to exploit the currency fluctuation. I know people who do hedge for currency fluctuations and use cash to do it.
_________________
Gosh, it's sure been a sad year.

Hang gliding Videos :: RE: Moyes Gecko 155 Demo Flight Narrated

4 September, 2015 - 21:01
Author: NMERider
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 1:01 pm (GMT -8)

jcsaal wrote: Jonathan,
Thanks a lot for the video and all the good information thru the narration of your flight, sure it shows was a bumpy day.
I really liked the two shots on the beginning where you held the glider up to show its platform and at least to me it looks like a bit narrower in cord at the root when compared to my old S2, that picture also helped me understand why on specs Moyes lists it as a 70/90% double surface. Those differences are probably in part responsible for the trucky feeling of it.
I had a flight on a Litesport 4S a long time ago and my impressions were similar when comparing it to a US-145.
Does the kingpost/luff line compensation system on the Gecko offers anything usable or is it just a gimmick, did you felt anything in flight that would make you want to have it?

The S2 has evolved and been refined over the years, It will be interesting to see what changes are made to this Gecko early on its life since this is its first incarnation, the S2 is pretty much a standard and Moyes was missing a glider in between the Malibu and the Litesport so I have no doubt it will become a successful glider for them in their native market where most pilots had to go into Stings or S2s if they wanted progression before going to an advanced/performance glider.

Lots of good info on the video, thanks again man.
Hi jcsaal,

If people go back in time and watch the narrated demo flights I did on three different Wills Wing gliders during SoCal Demo Days it will hopefully become apparent that the T2C 136 was trimmed incorrectly for my hook-in weight and that I found the glider to be very twitchy and requiring conscious compensation for the trim issue. Although it performed great I would never fly that glider at my weight. But a friend of mine who hooks in like 40# or more less than I did demo'd the same glider and was looking and feeling great. He now now owns a T2C 136. But the glider needed to match the pilot in many respects.


Link


It also helps to give the demo pilot some kind of briefing before sending them on their merry way on an unfamiliar glider. In his case, I knew this pilot and fly with him and could offer suggestions if needed. In my case I had nobody saying anything to me and hucked off into the wild blue salad shaker. So, by not knowing in advance that this Gecko 155 is rigged differently than my Sport 2 155 I inadvertently flew into bad turbulence by bar position rather than by angle of attack. As a result of this I repeatedly became overpowered and the glider 'felt' like a truck.

During course of the flight I noticed that the Gecko had minimal adverse yaw and was not getting dumped out of thermals and so something didn't add up. I switched to flying by bar pressure and by airflow over the wing, which can actually be heard and felt, and voilà. Now I could actually feel how the glider actually responded. By the end it felt a bit slower to respond than my Sport 2 155 but was much quicker than my T2C 144. This seems consistent with the fact that the root cord is shorter while the tips are broader. So the Gecko 155 responds like it has a greater wing span difference over the Sport 2 155 than it actually does.

Yes, it also has more double surface out near the tips but the lower surface is visibly loser in the same region which keeps the sail flexible and compliant even when drawn tight. When I demo flew the latest T2C 144 I noticed the same change in lower surface sail cut compared to earlier year models.

As far as the variable height kingpost wires are concerned, I have no comment on this one way or the other unless I were allowed to re-tune the rope that goes into the kingpost and see whether giving it a little more slack changes the handling. I know from the old days ca 1980 that if you made the upper sidewire tension to high on your Moyes Mega II it would ruin the handling and if you left the wires floppy it was much better. But that glider had a fixed crossbar and a huge floating keel pocket.

I fly my Sport 2 155 in all kinds of air and I'm accustomed to the floppy side wires while launching in 1/4 VG. I know other pilots who dislike this. The Gecko has no sidewire slop. It also appears to be tuned correctly in that there is just enough slack at each VG setting to give the luff lines the freedom they need to allow the sails to shift but not so much slack that it compromises the pitch stability.

I also get some pretty big wire slaps when I'm flying my Sport 2 VG loose that I won't get on the Gecko with the compensator system. If I was a pilot who gets spooked out of the air by wire slaps then I may want to upgrade to a glider that doesn't go 'Twang!".

So this is a fair question and my opinion is that the system is real and performs a task but it adds to the price of the glider. But if by not having the compensator a pilot is missing otherwise good flying conditions and is now on the ground then he may want to reconsider his glider choices.

Now, one thing I did not address in the video or anywhere else so far is the difference in sail cut and workmanship. The curved tip area in the Gecko was beautifully sculpted and nearly wrinkle-free. I have seen too many transverse wrinkles on the Sport 2 155. On my own glider I added a round layer of foam to the tip wands in order to take up the slack in the sail. Not only does this clean up the tip area significantly I consistently seem to be getting a better glide when I use the foam versus when I don't.

Also the tip wand themselves are radically different between the gecko and Sport 2. I found rigging and de-rigging the Gecko tip wand to be far easier. I also noted that the wands on the Gecko freely rotate in on the cups and sockets and facilitate greater freedom of tip movement. It is my opinion that the Gecko has less adverse yaw for this reason than on the Sport 2 in spite of the somewhat heavier roll input. I hope this makes sense. It takes me a little more effort to roll the Gecko but it seems less likely to fall out the side of a thermal while initiating a turn.

This is important to pilot who either compete or who push their margins. I push my margins and I push them pretty hard. I felt confident pushing the Gecko further than I'd be inclined to push my Sport 2 in the same air and terrain. I was treating the glider closer to how I'd fly my T2C but I was able to crank into thermals easier. yes, there was a small effort penalty versus my Sport 2 but I wasn't missing any climbs and I was hitting all my glides without having to bailout.

So now you have a fuller appreciation of some of my impressions of the differences between the two gliders. There are price factors, handling factors and performance factors. All of these things need to be weighed out for each pilot. I can't do it for anyone other than myself.

Lastly, and most obviously is the physical appearance of each glider while sitting in the LZ or on launch. The Gecko is the hands-down winner of the beautiful outline contest and if a pilot wants the coolest looking glider regardless of price or flying performance then the choice is a no-brainer.

When I was pretty much the only pilot around me area with a Freedom 170 I was getting glider oogles like nobody's business. That really gave my ego a good stroking But I don't look at my glider when I fly it other than to check for flutter (and my Freedom had horrible flutter until I fixed it with my sewing machine) or other problems. So for me, being the guy with the coolest car at the burger joint was short-lived. I sold my Freedom to pay for my Sensor and kept my Falcon 3 195.

Everyone has different priorities and my own priorities are just that--my own.

Cheers,
Jonathan
_________________
Gosh, it's sure been a sad year.

Hang gliding general :: RE: Optimal pilot body weight

4 September, 2015 - 20:59
Author: LW
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:59 pm (GMT -8)

JackieB wrote:

I say that I'm confident because I had a PhD aeronautical engineer tell me that wing loading is what determines whether or not an aircraft can soar (ie extend a flight beyond simply gliding). I asked him specifically what determines whether or not an aircraft can soar.

Wing loading is not the only factor. For example; a more efficient glider with a higher wing loading and lower sink rate could out climb a less efficient glider with a lighter wing loading but higher sink rate.

Quote:
Using sailplanes as an example, pilots often add water ballast for penetration and speed. Best L/D is always the same for a given aircraft (it's a function of the design),

Apples and oranges. A flex wing hang glider does not maintain the best L/D ratio as wing loading is increased like a sailplane. When you increase loading in a flex wing it creates more twist and the wing performance decrease. The polar doesn't just move over, it changes shape.

This effect is more pronounced on lower performing (more flexible) hang gliders, and less pronounced on stiffer gliders. That explains why comp gliders are sometimes flown with ballast, but you wouldn't fly a Falcon with ballast to try to improve glide performance.

Hang gliding general :: RE: Does VG affect sink rate?

4 September, 2015 - 20:32
Author: LW
Subject: Re: Re does VG setting have an effect on sink rate
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:32 pm (GMT -8)

Sford wrote:
The short answer: yes, sink rate improves at higher VG settings. But all of the cardinal speeds (stall, min sink, best glide) increase at higher VG settings (edited for clarification at 23:31 MDT)

The polar doesn't simply shift over with change in VG like it does with change in wing loading.

The polar changes shape with VG, so all speeds are not change uniformly or even in the same direction on the polar.

Hang gliding general :: RE: Does VG affect sink rate?

4 September, 2015 - 20:15
Author: TjW
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:15 pm (GMT -8)

su27sushka wrote: TjW,

Your point related to CsubL proves that the sink rate will be better when VG is ON, not that the stall speed will be lower when VG is ON. As I noted, when the VG ON wing has stalled, the VG OFF wing will keep flying at that speed. The sink rate will be bad, but it will keep flying.

The total lift generated by the wing will be proportional to CsubL V^2

If CsubL is larger, then V must be smaller to generate the same amount of lift.

CsubL of the less twisted wing is larger at all AOAs, including stall.

So the speed at stall is lower, because the weight, and so the amount of lift being generated, is identical for both twisted and untwisted wings.

This is why designers add flaps to airplanes. Flaps down increase the wing's overall CsubL, lowering the stall speed.

Hang gliding Videos :: RE: Greenpoint, Michigan. Fall flying at a beautiful site.

4 September, 2015 - 20:13
Author: JackieB
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:13 pm (GMT -8)

Two hours from my house! I'm not quite capable of flying there yet, but I'm getting closer (H2 with 13 hours now) and have been working on my skills by aerotowing this summer.

I'm pretty good at foot-launching from Lookout, but don't have my AWCL skill sign-off yet, so I have to earn that as well.

I can't wait!

Thanks so much for sharing!

Hang gliding general :: RE: Does VG affect sink rate?

4 September, 2015 - 20:10
Author: LW
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:10 pm (GMT -8)

su27sushka wrote: TjW,

Your point related to CsubL proves that the sink rate will be better when VG is ON, not that the stall speed will be lower when VG is ON. As I noted, when the VG ON wing has stalled, the VG OFF wing will keep flying at that speed. The sink rate will be bad, but it will keep flying.

I think this argument comes down to the definition of a stall.

When any part of the wing stalls, we consider that a stall, it doesn't matter if it's still 'controllable', the wing (or part of it) is in a stalled state.

With VG tight (less twist) more of the wing is producing lift. That means required airspeed for any given angle off attack is lower, and that equates to a slower stall speed, or a slower speed when the critical angle of attack is reached.

With VG loose, less lift is produced for a given angle of attack, that means the airspeed at critical angle of attack is higher. The twist allows the root to stall and tips to keep flying, so you can maintain control while part of the wing is stalled. But the wing is still considered stalled, and the stall happens at a higher airspeed than with VG tight.

Hang gliding general :: RE: Does VG affect sink rate?

4 September, 2015 - 20:09
Author: Tormod
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:09 pm (GMT -8)

Quote: Why trainer gliders (Alpha, Falcon) don’t have VG at all, which means the VG is always OFF? It makes the stall speed low, making it safer to land.


The stall speed is low beacuse of the wide cord and the high cambered airfoil.

Hang gliding general :: RE: Does VG affect sink rate?

4 September, 2015 - 20:04
Author: su27sushka
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:04 pm (GMT -8)

dayhead wrote: su27sushka wrote: TjW,

Your point related to CsubL proves that the sink rate will be better when VG is ON, not that the stall speed will be lower when VG is ON. As I noted, when the VG ON wing has stalled, the VG OFF wing will keep flying at that speed. The sink rate will be bad, but it will keep flying.

I wanna see the evidence before I believe you.

I agree, the real life evidence would be good. I'll experiment with stalling my Sport2 155 at VG off and on next time I fly. I hope the difference will be noticeable. I've heard that U2 is quite different with VG off/on, but I've never flew U2.

Hang gliding general :: RE: Optimal pilot body weight

4 September, 2015 - 20:02
Author: JackieB
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:02 pm (GMT -8)

In weaker thermals, I feel confident that it comes down to wing loading. Therefore, weight does make a difference since wing loading is a measurement per sq. foot of the total weight divided by lifting area.

I say that I'm confident because I had a PhD aeronautical engineer tell me that wing loading is what determines whether or not an aircraft can soar (ie extend a flight beyond simply gliding). I asked him specifically what determines whether or not an aircraft can soar.

Using sailplanes as an example, pilots often add water ballast for penetration and speed. Best L/D is always the same for a given aircraft (it's a function of the design), but occurs at a higher speed if the aircraft is heavier. However, if the lift is weak, the heavier aircraft can't climb as efficiently. Sailplane pilots will dump the water if the lift is light because the extra weight hinders their ability to climb.

Another area would be the design of the glider itself. Some planforms are more efficient than others, so your answer is definitely some combination of wing loading and design.

Also, wing loading on hang gliders is so light across the board that perhaps an aeronautical engineer or comparable expert would say that the effects of the 30 lbs or so that you are talking about are negligible because it's a super-light wing loading either way. I don't know on that, but would be curious to hear.

Hang gliding Videos :: RE: Moyes Gecko 155 Demo Flight Narrated

4 September, 2015 - 19:55
Author: NMERider
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 11:55 am (GMT -8)

seb wrote: great job bud

Pros and cons...calling it like you see it !

Thanks seb. Right after landed I sent an email to Kraig advising him of the flutter in the one panel. I checked the batten tension first and noted that the surrounding battens were too loose. I tightened the those batten tip levers until the batten pockets tensioned at a 20* tip lever angle. I checked the left side and made it symmetrical to the right.

Yesterday afternoon I received the following reply from Kraig:

Kraig Coomber wrote: Thanks for the heads up Jonathan. Since the flutter is only on the one wing it leads me to believe that this is batten tension related. I will check it out as soon as I get the opportunity. I will have the glider back in my possession next week since I plan to bring it out to Arizona with me.

I watched your video of the demo flight. I too noticed that the bar position was quite a bit further aft compared to the other gliders I fly. It was necessary for me to make a significant adjustment to my flying style as I found myself flying the glider too close to stall out of habit. Once I made the adjustment the glider became much more manageable (it’s amazing what a couple extra mph will do). After watching your footage it seemed to me (especially in the earlier parts of the flight) that you were also flying the glider too slow. I noticed it more when you were in search and climb mode and there were a number of times when the mid span of the wing appeared to be buffeting which indicates a break up in airflow. As your flight progressed, it became less of an issue as I think you were subconsciously adjusting to the foreign bar position and flying the glider a little faster. My test flight was late afternoon in smooth conditions so I was able to identify the airspeed situation immediately. I’m not sure I would have identified the issue as quickly in the conditions you were flying in. Without talking to Gerolf to confirm, I believe the reasoning for this frame configuration is that he may have been more focused on where the bar is positioned on tight setting which I‘m sure you would agree is quite comfortable.

Kraig

BTW - I was going to insert my comments on your FB post but I was concerned it would come off as defensive. I figured it would be more appropriate to email you personally and leave it for you to share. Thanks for your feedback!

Moyes USA
www.moyesusa.com
www.glidertrader.com
fly@moyesusa.com

I replied to this as follows:
Jonathan... wrote:
Hi Kraig,

Your keen observations are spot on. I did the narration in one take and it's essentially ad lib with the aid of some notes I quickly scrawled out.
Anyone who is actually listening and watching would have picked up on the essential comments regarding the fact that I did 2+ hours in this turbulence and I felt fine the next day with no soreness. Rather than doing multiple takes I figured that truly interested pilots would simply ask. Ideally this video at least motivates potential pilots to approach their dealers and take it from there. Let's be honest in that pilots buy gear that meets with the approval of their peers at least as much as the way it flies for the particular pilot.I meant what I said about doing a head-to-head but I won't be holding my breath. My real interest is in getting pilots to pick whichever model and brand glider suits their personal flying style and yields the greatest recreational enjoyment. Hopefully I come across as reasonably neutral.

Given the opportunity I would gladly fly a Gecko again and preferably going X/C OTB and out into the desert.

Cheers,

Jonathan

Kraig very courteously gave me a call and I brought up the following things that were still on my mind:

1 - VG rope tension (I like the rope in my hand)
2 - VG Cleat arrangement
3 - Rear wire pigtail.
4 - Bar position.
5 - Handling and bar movement

Here's what I gleaned from the conversation:

1 - The VG range is huge. As you can see in the video the sail goes from very billowy to very flat and from my experience it all works. But the pulley reduction is set to be able to cover the wise range in just two pulls on the rope. If I were to buy a Gecko I could have pulley(s) added that would reduce the tension but require more pulls on the rope.

2 - I explained my personal nit about the angle on the cleat and we got into the question of flying with the rope either cleated (Kraig's preference) or hand-held (my preference). Kraig explained that he keeps the rope cleated by holds the tail of the rope in his hand with his hand a few inches from the cleat. With the flick of a wrist, the tensioned VG rope can be disengaged from the cleat and the sail loosened. I told Kraig that I during my demo flight I adapted by keeping the tail of the rope in my hand but was holding my hand further inboard on the raked back part of the speedbar.

My guess is that by adapting to flying with my hand close to the cleat while VG tight and with the rope in my hand, it would take care of this issue for me. Otherwise if I wanted I could have pulley(s) added to accommodate hand-held VG rope. I recall the online posts several years ago preceding the introduction of the extra pulleys on the T2C 144 which is now standard. I think the Litespeeds already had a longer pull at that time.

Because I use the entire range of the VG system very actively on every glider I fly this is a big deal for me. I use the full range on my Sport 2 155 constantly as I tend to fly in fairly active air and get in and out of tight spots on a regular basis.

3 - I asked about the purpose of the rear wire pigtail (The 'Y') and my personal nit about the riser junction on my cocoon harness twanging on the rear wire. The answer to this was interesting. Moyes has been using the rear pigtail wire junction for several decades. It facilitates keel float and improves the handling. The Australians don't typically fly with cocoon harnesses and so there is no exposed hardware to get snagged. My Wills Wing Flylite3 cocoon has sewn-in leg loops with no adjustment buckle unlike my HES cocoon harness where the buckles would frequently snag on all of my glider's rear wires until I covered the buckles with gaffers tape. So it's really just a nit for me on not an issue as I fly my T2C 144 with my cocoon and even race with it.

4 - Control bar position and control bar range of movement are related. Gerolf designed it this way because of the huge VG range which results in the bar position changing quite dramatically from fore to aft as it is on the Litespeed. Given the wide VG range it is actually in the optimal overall position but a few inches further aft at trim than my Sport 2 155 and it takes getting used to. But once I adapted, i didn't even notice the difference.

5 - Handling (that I described as Truck-Like). All gliders will handle like a truck when flown too slowly especially in turbulence as I was in all afternoon. This relates back to #4 (control bar position). Because I held the bar where I normally hold it as soon as I launched, climbed and went on glide I was holding it that position farther aft and so the glider handled like a truck. If I did this on my Sport 2 155 or T2C 144 I would have had the same reaction. Since I continued to fly in turbulence for the next few hours it took me a while to build up confidence, become acclimated and relax. Once I flew the glider as trimmed and not as rigged, then I wasn't having any handling issues other than those that were induced by turbulence or by deliberately slowing the glider down.

Even Kraig had this issue when he first flew the same glider but it was in laminar coastal air and he was able to adjust very quickly. This is not an easy thing to do in the turbulence plainly visible in the video. Furthermore, nobody told me anything about the glider or gave me any pointers before I flew it.

So #5 which was initially my biggest quip about the heavy handling turned out to be a result of the aft bar position and the aft bar position turned out to be a result of the very wide VG range and an attempt to rig it similar to the Litespeed. But there's a lesson here for anyone flying an unfamiliar model glider especially in turbulence for the first time. When we are fighting turbulence we may not be thinking about our angle of attack so much as we are reverting to holding the bar where we are accustomed. It's difficult to relax and get the feel when we are getting tossed about like salad while struggling to prevent a sled ride.

Many different pilots flew this same demo glider and nobody else had any complaints about the handling, They were all in very smooth coastal air or in smooth thermals the day I did the demo on the Malibu 2 188. Andy Beem from Windsports was flying the Gecko 155. I was supposed to take the Gecko up at 11AM that same day last week but we had no morning shuttle and I lost my place in the queue. Andy was enthralled with the glider and I flew with him enough to see why. He weighs 30# less than I do and was just tearing it up and climbing right through everyone. That was very smooth thermal lift.

I fly in a lot of rowdy air and once I got dialed in on Wednesday's demo flight I was having a good time and couldn't wait to dig out and go on glide again and again. So this glider has a lot of potential and I'm sure it will be an excellent fit for many pilots out there and trying to make a decision. I look at every piece of hang gliding equipment as being very personal, just like fishing tackle, firearms, tennis racquets, golf clubs, etc. I would have to know the pilot as well as the glider in order to match the two. I'm not a dealer and have minimal commercial involvement in this sport. I have no sponsorship.

Sporting equipment and the player need to be matched to each other like skis, boots and bindings with the experience and slopes. In this case based on the type of flying the pilot wants to do and his or her individual strengths, weaknesses and goals. I have been known to suggest to pilots who I do know and fly with to move up down or sideways in their equipment so they may have safer and more enjoyable flying. Hopefully, more pilots will now become aware of this choice and where it fits in with the other choices available.
_________________
Gosh, it's sure been a sad year.

Hang gliding general :: RE: Optimal pilot body weight

4 September, 2015 - 18:46
Author: guachetronix
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:46 am (GMT -8)

I'm 224lbs naked, 255 hook in weight.
My U2 160 handle very well and Climb very nice.
In light conditions it climb slower than the others but I can deal with that.
Oscar G.
_________________
Moyes Mega, Atlas, Ultrasport, Sport2, U2

Macte, nova virtute, puer SIC ITUR AD ASTRA

Hang gliding Videos :: RE: Moyes Gecko 155 Demo Flight Narrated

4 September, 2015 - 18:42
Author: NMERider
Subject: Re: Moyes Gecko 155 Demo Flight Narrated
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:42 am (GMT -8)

PupsegAS wrote: Fantastik video! Thanks you! I will do more like these in the future.
_________________
Gosh, it's sure been a sad year.

Hang gliding Videos :: RE: Moyes Gecko 155 Demo Flight Narrated

4 September, 2015 - 18:42
Author: NMERider
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:42 am (GMT -8)

waveview wrote: Nice flying, that air looked turbulent. The camera angle sure does show how flat the sail gets on the Gecko with full VG applied. Thanks. Yeah, it was sure turbulent. The only time I really got overpowered was when I was flying too slow and crossing the Pacoima Wash where it's not unusual to get blown into the venturi regardless of what I'm flying. And that sail pulls nearly as tight as a topless too. Gliding in the 38 to 48 mph was very impressive. In a race harness it would be a fun to see how it hangs in with other gliders.
Cheers, Jonathan
_________________
Gosh, it's sure been a sad year.

Hang gliding general :: RE: Does VG affect sink rate?

4 September, 2015 - 18:38
Author: guachetronix
Posted: Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:38 am (GMT -8)

You can probe it with your gps.
My U2 160 goes faster with full VG, but if you slow down a bit, your L/D improbe.
_________________
Moyes Mega, Atlas, Ultrasport, Sport2, U2

Macte, nova virtute, puer SIC ITUR AD ASTRA